Saturday, January 28, 2012

Girl and the Movie

This past year I was lucky to see the much touted about movie "Hugo" in all of its glory.

Like most good movies, Hugo left you with many (more) undeniable reasons to believe in why Martin Scorsese is one of today's best moving picture story tellers.

To say it was well worth the ticket price, is undermining how much more the story of Hugo impacted my spirit.

By similar fashion, the first movie I saw this year was "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close."

At first glance, the story of a child impacted by the death of his father during the World Trade Center attacks seems emotionally cliche:  "Of course a child will have a hard time navigating the various emotions when he looses his father."

But to limit the story to simply the loss of a parent figure, shadows how much more the movie is able to portray to its viewers. Emotions being only one aspect of this film.

Again, another fabulous movie that everyone should watch.

In both cases I noticed similarities: both protagonists were young boys, both lost their fathers, and both empowered themselves through their difficult lives to find themselves.

Then I asked myself: why is it that Hollywood paints young women as needy victims that need to be saved?

Could a girl play these parts with the same quirks and eccentricities as those young boys did, and still be successful in her quest to find herself?

Why is it that when a boy lashes out with his opinion it's "thought-provoking," instead of being categorized as "difficult?" (as a girl would be in the same situation)

I wonder if a "girl" becomes a "girl" because movies paint her as such:

Pink-wearing, princess-ogling, needy human beings that can only find themselves with the help, of course, of the men in their lives.

What do you think?

2 comments:

  1. Unfortunately we have to write the parts we want to see in Hollywood, they are not going to magically appear, be it an empowered woman, a Latino family that is NOT a stereotype, a succesful Latina, etc.

    Tracy @ Ascending Butterfly

    ReplyDelete
  2. But for those of us that are not Hollywood writers, I think we should also make an effort by *not* supporting films that keep our girls bound by an antiquated view of femininity.

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Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me!

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